Archive | September 1, 2014

Willow- Adriana Kraft- Giveaway

Spotlight on Willow Smoke by Adriana Kraft

Just released! Book Three in the Riders Up series by Adriana Kraft

Willow-Smoke-eBook-web

Willow Smoke (Riders Up, Book Three)

September 1, 2014, B&B Publishing
ISBN: 978-0-9907476-0-4
ASIN: B00N0DH13I
Romantic Suspense
Heat rating: three flames (explicit sex, m/f)
Cover by Rebecca Poole Dreams2Media

BLURB

When the chips are down, there’s nobody there. Willowy blond Daisy Matthews has survived the Chicago streets with this mantra but is unprepared for the much older Nick Underwood’s urgent pursuit. The wealthy businessman receives a thoroughbred in payment for a bad debt and is thrust into Daisy’s world. She teaches him about horse racing; he teaches her about love. When Daisy’s seamy brother-in-law threatens Nick’s safety, she doggedly tries to stop him by herself, but flees to the familiar streets when he attacks. Can Nick find her in time – and if he does, will she still want him?

REVIEW

Five stars at Goodreads “…dreams can become reality, love can transcend age… Exciting, engaging and very entertaining story. The character interplay is spot on and the story is extremely well written.” Donna H.

BUY LINK

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00N0DH13I

When the Chips are Down, There’s Nobody There

Daisy-PromoDaisy Matthews grew up on the streets of Chicago, and if she learned anything, it was that she could count on no one to help her, ever. She knows she has to tough it out, protect herself, and when necessary, protect anyone she cares about. All by herself. No one else will do it for her.

Hubs and I have loved writing Daisy and her story. We first introduced her in Cassie’s Hope (Riders Up, Book One) – she’s the teenage waif in the group home where Cassie worked before she went back to training horses. We’ve known so many kids like her across our social service and academic careers. There’s a special kind of resilience that comes from growing up that way; kids who don’t develop it probably don’t make it, and we’ve known some of those, too.

She doesn’t know who her father is. Her mother, who died of an overdose when Daisy was little, was a prostitute. Fortunately for Daisy, her rock-solid grandmother took her in, but that grandmother died when Daisy was eleven. Unadoptable for whatever reason, she ended up in a group home through her early teenage years, until Cassie and Clint Travers became her foster parents.

We’ve dedicated this book to two of our ancestors who faced severe social stigma more than a century ago: my great grandfather, who was born to an unmarried teenage logging camp cook in the Pennsylvania mountains, and hubby’s great grandmother, a quarter-blood Cherokee in an era when the family tried to hide that information out of shame.

Maybe we gave Daisy an extra boost when we paired her with a handsome wealthy hunk in his early forties, but we think she deserves a bang-up happy ending for her determination, grit, and courage in the face of present day social stigma. We hope you’ll agree.

EXCERPT

“I won’t let anything hurt you.” Daisy Matthews finished wrapping the ankles of the chestnut mare and sat back on her haunches to evaluate her work. The mare’s ankles were cooler than they had been two hours earlier.

It wasn’t easy to convince a horse to stand in buckets of ice, but after three years of being a groom and an exercise rider, she could do it about as well as anybody at Arlington Park. At least that was what her boss said when he promoted her to assistant trainer.

Daisy grinned. There wasn’t much prestige associated with being an assistant trainer for a fellow with a string of only twenty-some claimers and allowance horses, but it was something, particularly for a girl from the wrong side of the tracks.

RainbowBlaze took a step forward. “I know.” Daisy groaned. “Step one: pay attention. Sorry, I got lost daydreaming.You’re right. Taking care of you is an important job.” She chuckled. “I can’t think of anything I’d rather be doing.”

“Hey kid, do you always talk to horses?”

The horse reared and pawed. “It’s okay, girl.” Daisy kept her voice soft and ran her hand slowly along the mare’s neck.

When the mare had stopped trembling, Daisy stepped out of the stall, shaded her eyes from the sun and faced the interloper. She scowled at the man’s new sneakers, monogrammed shirt and neatly pressed slacks. He looked liked he’d be more at home on a sailboat than in a barn.

Adriana TFOB March 2014ABOUT ADRIANA KRAFT

Adriana Kraft is the pen name for a husband/wife team writing sizzling romantic suspense and erotic romance. The award-winning pair has published over thirty romance novels and novellas to outstanding reviews. Romantic pairings include straight m/f, lesbian, bisexual, ménage and polyamory, in both contemporary and paranormal settings.

ADRIANA KRAFT ON THE WEB

Website: http://adrianakraft.com
Blog: http://adrianakraft.com/blog
Facebook Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Adriana-Kraft/182846025133440
Twitter http://twitter.com/AdrianaKraft
GoodReads http://www.goodreads.com/author/list/1578571.Adriana_Kraft
Shelfari http://www.shelfari.com/adrianakraft
Google+ https://plus.google.com/102791537641895264573/posts
Pinterest http://www.pinterest.com/adrianakraft5/boards/

CONTEST

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Rosalind James ~ Just For You ~ Interview ~ Virtual Book Tour

Just for YouContemporary Romance / NOVELLA
Date Published: July 31, 2014
   

No shirt, no shoes, no … problems?

Hemi Ranapia isn’t looking for love. Fun, yes. Love, not so much. But a summer fishing holiday to laid-back Russell could turn out to be more adventure than this good-time boy ever bargained for.

Reka Harata hasn’t forgotten the disastrously sexy rugby star she met a year ago, no matter how much she wishes she could. Too bad Hemi keeps refusing to be left in her past.

Sometimes, especially in New Zealand’s Maori Northland, it really does take a village. And sometimes it just takes a little faith.

NOTE: This 36,000-word (120-page) novella begins about six years before the events of Just This Once, and yes, it gets a little steamy at times, because Reka and Hemi are just that way. It can be read as a stand-alone book, even if this is your first escape to New Zealand.

Excerpt: 

She’d noticed him even while she’d been walking down the aisle in the wharenui, wearing the stupid strapless dress of blood-red satin that Victoria had chosen, a dress she was definitely not going to be wearing again, a dress that had “bridesmaid” written all over it. She’d been supposed to be paying attention to her pace, and instead she’d been looking at the man sitting at the end of the row, up there to her right. A man who was looking right back at her. A mate of the groom’s, she knew, because Victoria had told them all he was coming.

Hemi Ranapia, the starting No. 10 for the Auckland Blues, one of the year’s new caps for the All Blacks, and about the finest specimen of Maori manhood she’d ever seen. His dark, wavy hair cut short and neat, his brown eyes alive with interest as he watched her. A physique to die for, too, his shoulders broad in the black suit, his waistline trim, the size of his arms and thighs making it clear that the suit hadn’t come off any rack, because that had taken some extra material.

She’d stood in her neat row to one side of the bride throughout the service, had done her best to keep her attention on the event, and had felt his gaze on her as surely as if he’d been touching her. She’d had to will herself not to shiver, and the look he sent her way, unsmiling and intent, when she walked back up the aisle again told her she hadn’t been imagining his interest.

She’d still had what felt like hours of photo-taking to come. Standing around endlessly, smiling in the sunshine, arranging and rearranging herself according to the photographer’s instructions, being flirted with by one of the groomsmen, with Hemi in and out of her view all the while. His suit coat off now, his tie loosened, white shirt stretching across chest and shoulders. A beer in his hand and a smile on his face, having a chat with the other boys, being approached, at first shyly and then with enthusiasm, by the kids.

And by the girls, she saw with a twinge of jealousy that made no sense at all, as one after another of them smiled for him, touched her hair, touched his arm. It looked to her like every unattached woman at the  wedding, and more than one of the partnered ones as well, was going out of her way to chat him up. And he wasn’t exactly resisting.

But he was looking at her all the same. Every now and then, she glanced across and his gaze caught hers, and she saw an expression on his face, an intensity and a heat that were making her burn.

By the time the photography was done and she was released at last, the wedding party moving into the wharekai so the eating and drinking and dancing could begin, she was well and truly warmed up, and tingling more than a little in every single place she could imagine him touching with those clever hands, the hands she somehow knew would handle a woman as deftly as they handled a rugby ball.

The band began to play, the bride and groom stepped into their first dance, and she saw him edging his way around an animated group towards her, a glass in each hand. He reached her side, handed her the flute of champagne with the flash of a smile.

“Think you earned this,” he told her.

She took it, and he touched his glass to hers.

“Cheers,” he said with another white smile, the heat in his gaze unmistakable at this range. He tipped his brown throat back and drank, and she mirrored his action, felt golden bubbles popping against her tongue, the cool liquid sliding down her own throat. Drinking together like that somehow felt as intimate as kissing him, and the tongues of flame were licking every secret spot now.

“Took your time, didn’t you?” she asked him with a cool she wasn’t even close to feeling.

He laughed. “Didn’t want to seem too eager. Doing my best to be smooth here, but it’s hard going.”

Another long drink, another long look as Victoria and Mason finished their dance and the band began another number, a fast one, and couples started filling the floor.

“Think I can get a dance?” he asked.

“Mmm, I think you could,” she said. “Maybe so.”

BUY LINKS

Rosalind James

Interview, August 2014

You’re a relative newcomer to Romance. When did you start writing?

I’m a newcomer because I really did just start. I worked in publishing for 20 years, but on the editorial and marketing sides. I never, ever thought of writing fiction myself, not even a short story. Then, a couple years ago, a story came into my head as usual, but for once I didn’t push it away. Instead, I started writing it, and then I couldn’t stop. Within six weeks, I’d finished “Just This Once” and quit my job. The best part was, I was living in New Zealand at the time, so I wrote a book about New Zealand rugby. Which was lucky!

Where do you find your inspiration? 

Hmm. Google “All Blacks haka.” I’ll wait.

OK, well, that’s one reason. But seriously—why New Zealand?

Because I loved it so much. That’s the short answer, and the long answer. The longer you’re there, the more Kiwi culture seeps into your bones. The Maori influence, the geographical isolation (it’s just so FAR from everywhere), the sheer physical beauty of the place, they’re all part of it. You end up with this emphasis on family, the land (and the sea), hard work, and … well, I’d describe it as being a “regular person,” no matter who or what you are. Not being a jerk. Oh, and rugby.

All your heroes in that series are rugby players.  Why rugby? 

Umm … remember that “All Blacks haka” thing? Yeah. Tight jerseys, short shorts, full contact, big muscles, the “regular person” deal combined with the fact that the All Blacks (NZ’s national rugby team) are NZ’s version of movie stars—and the best team in the world. The pressure of that in a country of 4.5 million people, about 4 million of whom will recognize you walking down the street—and will come up to shake your hand, ask for an autograph or a picture, and you’ll be expected to smile and SAY YES. It’s life in a fishbowl, and good behavior is expected. Pretty different from the lives of athletes in other countries, and I just found it fascinating to think about what it would be like to be that person.

What type of relationship is your favorite to write? 

Romantically, I try to write very different characters every time. I normally start with the guy and find him the right girl. But I also love writing about parents and children, sisters and brothers, friends, the love of country and place. Sometimes when we say “love,” we forget about all the different kinds of love that enrich our lives. Several of my books are very much about fatherhood and motherhood. Plus, kids are funny.

You’ve written some different types of books, though, besides the New Zealand ones.

Yes, I started out writing sports romance, and I love it, but I also like to challenge myself. A couple of my books have a suspense element, because I wanted to see if I could do it. My first U.S.-based book, “Welcome to Paradise,” although still a romance, had a more complex storyline than the others (the reality show deal). I’m really just trying to have fun, do something different each time, and write the book in my head.

What has the publishing process been like for you? 

I started out doing the writing-to-agents thing, submitted to 38 different agents and publishers, got pretty discouraged. Three expressed interest, all ultimately said no. The problem seemed to be, “New Zealand rugby? Huh? Tough hook!” And I knew it was a GREAT hook! I KNEW it! Plus I had three books, and wanted to write another one.

So I put the three books I had up on Amazon, sold 2,000 ebooks the first month, 20,000 ebooks the fifth month, had a magical hour where I outranked Nora Roberts, published the paperbacks, started getting the audiobooks up, and it’s all still going great. Guess they were wrong … not that I’m gloating, LOL. Thank goodness for Amazon!

What are you working on now?

A brand-new romantic suspense series, set in Idaho! Can’t wait!

 

GIVEAWAY – $50 Amazon GC

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Rosalind James

Rosalind James, the bestselling author of the Escape to New Zealand and Kincaids series, is a former marketing executive who discovered her muse after several years of living and working in paradise–also known as Australia and New Zealand. Now, she spends her days writing about delicious rugby players, reality shows, corporate intrigue, and all sorts of other wonderful things, and having more fun doing it than should be legal.

Rosalind’s website: http://www.rosalindjames.com

On Facebook: rosalindjamesbooks

Twitter: www.twitter.com/RosalindJames5